Right now I've got three very old Recently Rescued Airedales (15, 14 and 14) and one very old Black Lab/Golden X (17) that we've had since he was found in a field as a tiny baby before he even had his eyes open. I thought you might want to hear about my nightly game of trying to sort out all the Seniors.

Around midnight when the others are all sound asleep, the Seniors and I go outside one last time, and then we come in and go to my bedroom for the night, but they do get confused... I go out with one, take him in, and point him toward the bedroom, then go out with another. I help the second one up the three steps from the patio, and the first one forgets he was out and has to go again, so I take #1 and #3 out, but then when we go in #2 wants to go back out. Then there's Reggie who does *not* want to go out but must or he will want to as soon as he hits his bed and won't make it back to the door. One by one I get them out/in/out/in and into their beds, but then they forget if they're going or coming and we have a little trouble getting us all into the bedroom for sleep. It really is a riot, but it's work because I'm always lifting, walking bent over to encourage somebody in the right direction, helping down steps, helping up steps, and trying to convince them all to get from point A to point B without too many backtrackings. Then it takes awhile to get each one actually on his bed, and then Champ needs his blankie, Racer needs his last drink of water, and they all get their tummy rubs and ear rubs and I get my kissies. LOL! Every night, this process is one of the highlights of my whole day, and it cracks me up, even as it tires me out. These guys are so dear! They need a lot, but they give so much more...!

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Airedale Information

The ATCA Rescue & Adoption Committee maintains and updates a network of contacts across the country to aid in the re-homing of purebred Airedale Terriers who are lost or abandoned. These contacts are volunteers located in several states, as well as Canada, working to help Airedales in need, adopting them to permanent loving homes.
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